Week 2: SeedScapes

by Maryalice Little of Harp & HeART

The biological definition of pollination involves birds and bees and flowers. But the idea of pollination can also be used in a broader sense. Pollination also occurs when one idea generates another idea, when one thing leads to another.

 

This year, CareFirst and Harp & HeART presented Seedscapes in week two of the Garden of Fire program. Maryalice Little played various moods of live harp music, helping to pollinate the ideas that each participant holds in his/her heart and mind. The unique seeds produced will be the creative expressions, the “mark making” using a variety of media, which each participant is inspired to draw.

Last year, a shorter version of this program was offered at the end of summer celebration. After listening to Beethoven’s Ode to Joy, the traditional Greensleeves, and an improvisation, one young participant was particularly articulate in her drawings and explanations including ideas of happiness and sadness, a sense of separation and helping each other.Gof.jpg

Is a guinea pig a pollinator?

By student participants Keagan and Destiny of Corning Area Youth Center

Last week, the Corning Youth Center hosted Garden of Fire! Tanglewood Nature Center showed us Powerful Pollinators. A lot of the kids were surprised by the animals. Did you know a pollinator is an animal that moves pollen from a male anther of a flower to the female stigma of a flower? This helps to bring about fertilization of the ovules in the flower.

Some of the animals were owl, bearded dragon, cockroach and guinea pig. Kids were most surprised to see the guinea pig because guinea pigs are sometimes seen as pets and most pollinators are not seen as pets.

The kids loved it they want to do it again. We are looking forward to the next Garden of Fire event.

 

Week 1: Clayful Pollinators!

This summer’s Garden of Fire program kicked off with a field trip to 171 Cedar Arts Center in Corning, NY. Counselors from CareFirst collaborated with Amanda Warren, artist and ceramic studio technician at 171 Cedar Arts to provide a program that integrates clay-making with mindfulness and emotional well-being.

They started the session with introducing the theme of Powerful Pollinators and had a brainstorming session. They discussed the roles of pollinators in nature and different types of symbolism for pollination. They were asked to choose their favorite pollinator or pollinated plant to design on their tile.

Students sketched designs and ideas for creating their own hive tile out of clay.  After a short demo led by Amanda, students used their sketched ideas to embellish their own clay tile with their designs by using additional clay, stamps and carving tools.

Next, students painted their tiles with underglaze. In groups, youth took turns touring the clay studio and had the opportunity to try out the pottery wheels. The basics of wheel throwing was compared to centering one’s self through life’s challenges. The act of opening, pulling and shaping clay was compared to how we shape our lives by overcoming many obstacles.