Week 2: SeedScapes

by Maryalice Little of Harp & HeART

The biological definition of pollination involves birds and bees and flowers. But the idea of pollination can also be used in a broader sense. Pollination also occurs when one idea generates another idea, when one thing leads to another.

 

This year, CareFirst and Harp & HeART presented Seedscapes in week two of the Garden of Fire program. Maryalice Little played various moods of live harp music, helping to pollinate the ideas that each participant holds in his/her heart and mind. The unique seeds produced will be the creative expressions, the “mark making” using a variety of media, which each participant is inspired to draw.

Last year, a shorter version of this program was offered at the end of summer celebration. After listening to Beethoven’s Ode to Joy, the traditional Greensleeves, and an improvisation, one young participant was particularly articulate in her drawings and explanations including ideas of happiness and sadness, a sense of separation and helping each other.Gof.jpg

Is a guinea pig a pollinator?

By student participants Keagan and Destiny of Corning Area Youth Center

Last week, the Corning Youth Center hosted Garden of Fire! Tanglewood Nature Center showed us Powerful Pollinators. A lot of the kids were surprised by the animals. Did you know a pollinator is an animal that moves pollen from a male anther of a flower to the female stigma of a flower? This helps to bring about fertilization of the ovules in the flower.

Some of the animals were owl, bearded dragon, cockroach and guinea pig. Kids were most surprised to see the guinea pig because guinea pigs are sometimes seen as pets and most pollinators are not seen as pets.

The kids loved it they want to do it again. We are looking forward to the next Garden of Fire event.